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Maiden Flight

ebook
Katharine Wright embodied the worldly, independent, and self-fulfilled New Woman of the early twentieth century, yet she remained in many ways a Victorian. Torn between duty and love, she agonized for months before making a devastating break with her world-famous and intensely possessive older brother Orville to marry newspaper editor Harry Haskell, the man she loved. Written by the grandson of Harry Haskell, Maiden Flight is imaginatively reconstructed from personal letters, newspaper reports, and other documents of the period—in particular, Katharine's lively and extraordinarily revealing love letters to Harry. Above all, the book celebrates Katharine's abundant store of what she called "human nature"—her lively and perceptive outlook on life, her great capacity for both love and indignation, and her acute and sometimes crippling self-awareness.

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Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Kindle Book

  • Release date: October 1, 2016

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781613736401
  • File size: 2613 KB
  • Release date: October 1, 2016

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9781613736401
  • File size: 2613 KB
  • Release date: October 1, 2016

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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

Katharine Wright embodied the worldly, independent, and self-fulfilled New Woman of the early twentieth century, yet she remained in many ways a Victorian. Torn between duty and love, she agonized for months before making a devastating break with her world-famous and intensely possessive older brother Orville to marry newspaper editor Harry Haskell, the man she loved. Written by the grandson of Harry Haskell, Maiden Flight is imaginatively reconstructed from personal letters, newspaper reports, and other documents of the period—in particular, Katharine's lively and extraordinarily revealing love letters to Harry. Above all, the book celebrates Katharine's abundant store of what she called "human nature"—her lively and perceptive outlook on life, her great capacity for both love and indignation, and her acute and sometimes crippling self-awareness.

Expand title description text