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The Bridge at Andau

Audiobook

The Bridge at Andau is James A. Michener at his most gripping. His classic nonfiction account of a doomed uprising is as searing and unforgettable as any of his bestselling novels. For five brief, glorious days in the autumn of 1956, the Hungarian revolution gave its people a glimpse at a different kind of future—until, at four o’clock in the morning on a Sunday in November, the citizens of Budapest awoke to the shattering sound of Russian tanks ravaging their streets. The revolution was over. But freedom beckoned in the form of a small footbridge at Andau, on the Austrian border. By an accident of history it became, for a few harrowing weeks, one of the most important crossings in the world, as the soul of a nation fled across its unsteady planks.
 
Praise for The Bridge at Andau
 
“Precise, vivid . . . immeasurably stirring.”The Atlantic Monthly
 
“Dramatic, chilling, enraging.”San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Superb.”Kirkus Reviews
 
“Highly recommended reading.”Library Journal


Expand title description text
Publisher: Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781101922149
  • File size: 297482 KB
  • Release date: August 4, 2015
  • Duration: 10:19:45

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781101922149
  • File size: 298050 KB
  • Release date: August 4, 2015
  • Duration: 10:02:40
  • Number of parts: 10

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

Languages

English

The Bridge at Andau is James A. Michener at his most gripping. His classic nonfiction account of a doomed uprising is as searing and unforgettable as any of his bestselling novels. For five brief, glorious days in the autumn of 1956, the Hungarian revolution gave its people a glimpse at a different kind of future—until, at four o’clock in the morning on a Sunday in November, the citizens of Budapest awoke to the shattering sound of Russian tanks ravaging their streets. The revolution was over. But freedom beckoned in the form of a small footbridge at Andau, on the Austrian border. By an accident of history it became, for a few harrowing weeks, one of the most important crossings in the world, as the soul of a nation fled across its unsteady planks.
 
Praise for The Bridge at Andau
 
“Precise, vivid . . . immeasurably stirring.”The Atlantic Monthly
 
“Dramatic, chilling, enraging.”San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Superb.”Kirkus Reviews
 
“Highly recommended reading.”Library Journal


Expand title description text